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Hamlet To Be Or Not To Be Essay Question

The meaning of the “to be or not to be” speech in Shakespeare’s Hamlet has been given numerous interpretations, each of which are textually, historically, or otherwise based. In general, while Hamlet’s famous “to be or not to be" soliloquy questions the righteousness of life over death in moral terms, much of the speech’s emphasis is on the subject of death—even if in the end he is determined to live and see his revenge through.

Before engaging in the soliloquy itself, however, it is important to consider Hamlet’s lines that occur before the passage in question. In the first act of the play, Hamlet (full character analysis of Hamlet here)curses God for making suicide an immoral option. He states, “that this too solid flesh would melt, / Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew! / Or that the Everlasting had not fix’d / His canon ‘gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!" (I.ii.129-132). At this early point in the text it is clear that Hamlet is weighing the benefits versus drawbacks of ending his own life, but also that he recognizes that suicide is a crime in God’s eyes and could thus make his afterlife worse than his present situation. In essence, many of Hamlet’s thoughts revolve around death and this early signal to his melancholy state prepares the reader for soliloquy that will come later in Act III. When Hamlet utters the pained question, “To be, or not to be: that is the question: / Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer / The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune / Or to take arms against a sea of troubles" (III.i.59-61) there is little doubt that he is thinking of death. Although he attempts to pose such a question in a rational and logical way, he is still left without an answer of whether the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" can be borne out since life after death is so uncertain.

At this point in the plot of Hamlet, he wonders about the nature of his death and thinks for a moment that it may be like a deep sleep, which seems at first to be acceptable until he speculates on what will come in such a deep sleep. Just when his “sleep" answer begins to appeal him, he stops short and wonders in another of the important quotes from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, “To sleep: perchance to dream:—ay there’s the rub; / For in that sleep of death what dreams may come" (III.i.68-69). The “dreams" that he fears are the pains that the afterlife might bring and since there is no way to be positive that there will be a relief from his earthly sufferings through death, he forced to question death yet again.

Decisions in Paradise: How To Be, or Not To Be – Part 1, 2 and 3

3539 words - 14 pages DUniversity of PhoenixMGT/350August 31, 2009Decisions in Paradise: How To Be, or Not To Be - Part 1An upscale retirement property management group, Senior Resources Group (SRG), has agreed to establish a community in Kava. In this paper, I will discuss the difficulties foreseen, evaluate, analyze, and recommend new solutions. According to the Business Scenario, the success of establishing a resort style, assisted living community for seniors will be challenging. SRG has several properties which cater to seniors; providing a luxurious atmosphere and lifestyle, allowing seniors to remain active and still keep "the importance of personal respect and dignity." (SRG/HAWTHORN 2008) SRG remains... VIEW DOCUMENT

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